Flash Book Sale!

As I mentioned earlier in the summer, I now have a secondhand bookshop on Amazon, where I sell books—many of them never-opened hardbacks—for cheapsies. I’m currently trying to free up some storage space, and have selected some of the books I’ve had around for a few months to be sacrificed to the Great Gods of Oxfam. They’ll be heading there on Monday… unless one of you wants one or more of them.

These will be on offer from now until Monday (12 September) at 12:00 pm (that’s noon) GMT. Here’s a link to my Amazon bookshop, where you can buy one of them* (or you can buy something else if it takes your fancy. I ain’t fussy.)

*I can’t sell or ship outside of the UK, I’m afraid (taxes make it not worthwhile).

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Highly attractive stripey vase not included

Making Nice, by Matt Sumell – Meet Alby. Natural habitat: a bar; a boat; his bedroom; a broad’s bedroom. Favourite hobbies: starting fights (then losing them); hooking up with broads (then losing them); hating cats (it’s a skill); training Gary the baby bird to be a killer (sort of). Best kept secret: when his mum died it broke his heart and he doesn’t really know what to do about it.

Daredevils, by Shawn Vestal – Fundamentalist Mormonism meets Evel Knievel in a 1970s coming-of-age tale that is all the better for subtly flicking the Vs at gender expectations, and for making religious extremism comprehensible. I really, really enjoyed this and would recommend it highly.

Collected Poems of Dylan Thomas – Thomas is a beautiful poet. He’s gnarly and alliterative, but he is beautiful. “Poem in October”, “Fern Hill”, and “In the White Giant’s Thigh” are probably my favorites for their sensuality and expressiveness.

Summerlong, by Dean Bakropoulos – A story about a marriage falling apart, this one foregrounding problems like debt, boredom, loneliness, and lying to someone you love out of a desire to protect them, and also maybe out of inertia. If you start to miss the warm months as the fall progresses, this will be the book to remind you of them again.

Birth of a Bridge, by Maylis de Kerangal – The mayor of a small Southern California town decides to make his mark by building an enormous bridge, but as workers flood into the area from all over the globe, the legacy of the area’s Native Americans is threatened. De Kerangal is most famous for Mend the Living, her recent novel about the transplant of a heart, and Birth of a Bridge is another almost mythic exploration of human passions and weaknesses.

KLAXON – I’m selling some books

Two things, dear bookworms:

  1. I’m now an official affiliate partner of Amazon, which means on the one hand that I am a corporate sell-out, yes, okay, thank you, please stop throwing tomatoes, but on the other hand that I’m making a tiny tiny bit of commission if you buy a book that I recommend through a link on this site. So from now on, when there are links to buy books in reviews, if you click through and subsequently buy the book, I’ll get a fraction of the book’s cost. If you totally hate Amazon and don’t even want to consider doing this, I forgive you; but if you already buy books from Amazon and have made your peace with that, this is a way to really help me out and to enable this site to keep going. I don’t get paid for anything I write about books at the moment – not here, not on Litro, not on Shiny New Books – so the affiliate program is important.
  2. I’m also now an official seller on Amazon, which means that I’m flogging books secondhand (almost all in spanking-new or like-new condition) through them. I sell under my own name (Eleanor Franzén). My “shopfront” is here – you can browse to your little heart’s content, and if there’s something you’d like but it’s not there, ask me. Again, if you spot something you fancy, buying it from me (for half, or less than half, of the original price) is a great way to tangibly support this site and the work I do here. I’ll be regularly featuring the things available in my Amazon shop over the coming weeks, so keep an eye out. Below is your first sampler:

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 Multitudes – Lucy Caldwell

A debut short story collection that bounces between Belfast and London, and which is already being touted as one of the season’s hottest books. Lucy Caldwell is earning accolades everywhere: Eimear McBride loves her; Kevin Power loves her; Emerald Street loves her. You probably will too.

 

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13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl – Mona Awad

First of all, the title is a Wallace Stevens joke, which I have a lot of time for; second of all, this is a novel about losing weight, and about how that doesn’t guarantee you the fairytale ending that we’re taught it will. It doesn’t even guarantee you better self-esteem, as Lizzie, the heroine of Awad’s debut novel, proves. Nor is this a sad or self-pitying book; instead, it’s bruisingly funny.

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Rebel of the Sands – Alwyn Hamilton

Without a doubt, the best YA fantasy to be published this year. The blurb says it all: “the first in a trilogy packed with shooting contests, train robberies, festivals under the stars, powerful Djinni magic and an electrifying love story.” It’s The Horse and His Boy for girls and without the casual racism. You know you want it.

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The House by the Lake –  Thomas Harding

In 1993, Thomas Harding’s grandmother took him to a deserted house outside Berlin. It was, she told him, the house from which she and her family had been forced to flee the Nazis. In 2013, Harding went back, and realized that the house and its grounds held tangible evidence of German history: the scar in the garden where the Berlin Wall had run through; photographs slipped through cracks in the floor. He determined to write the story of the house, and the five families who called it home. This book is the result.

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Villa America – Liza Klaussmann

From their villa in the French Riviera, Gerald and Sara Murphy throw parties that draw celebrities such as Picasso, the Fitzgeralds, and Hemingway. But the entrance of a young and handsome pilot into their charmed circle throws their lives, and their marriage, into disarray. I’d throw this one in a beach bag without a second’s hesitation.