Young Writer of the Year Shortlist

The embargo was lifted yesterday, when I was out of town, but it’s finally here! The official shortlist is as follows:

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Outlandish Knight by Minoo Dinshaw: a biography of Steven Runciman, a historian of the Byzantine era. We did surprisingly well with this in the bookshop—I haven’t the faintest idea what the significance of Steven Runciman is, but from the cover photo he looks rather Sebastian-from-Brideshead. We’ve all been sent the hardback, which is intimidating everyone. (It’s been out in paperback for at least a month, but I guess sending us the hardbacks is a nice way of getting them out of the warehouses…?)

The End of the Day by Claire North: I’ve not read any of Claire North’s work before, but it seems to be a sort of crossover-sci-fi affair. The tagline for this book is, “Sooner or later, Death visits everyone. Before that, they meet Charlie”, which is charming in a Pratchett-esque sort of way. I think I’ll enjoy it.

The Lucky Ones by Julianne Pachico: Just finished this, a terrifyingly polished, razor-sharp bunch of interlinked stories set in Colombia during the drug wars and paramilitary insurrections of the 1990s. It mostly follows the fates of a bunch of girls, school friends (or frenemies), and what happens to them during and after the war. Longer review to come soon.

Conversations With Friends by Sally Rooney: Contrary to most other panelists, this is the one I’m really not looking forward to. (Everyone else is dreading the Minshaw biography.) From what I’ve seen of this book, it’s very much about Young People living their Strange, Eccentric, Slightly Affectless Young People Lives, and I’m not sure I can put up with that since it is not a way of living that I (speaking with some authority as a Young Person) particularly recogise, either amongst myself or amongst many of the Young People I know. But maybe it’ll be terrific, I shall try to keep an open mind.

The Lauras by Sara Taylor: I read Taylor’s first book, The Shore, and it really knocked me out. This is equally wonderful—finished on the train last weekend—a mother-and-child road trip novel that captures sincerity without being sentimental, stoicism without being soulless. The story of Alex and Ma’s flight across the American continent is haunting, lovely, and enticing. Longer review to come soon.

I’m a bit disappointed not to see Homegoing and Elmet, but feel no great sense of rage about anything being left off. Have you read any of these? Have any strong feelings about any of them?

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Young Writer of the Year Shadow Panel

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I’m on it! Hooray!

This is going to be a short and probably flippant post, written at work in between deep-breathing sessions and feeling like my heart is about to leap up through my throat and strangle my brain, a la that terrible poet in Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Work is a lot.

Anyway, the announcement embargo has been lifted now, though the shortlist is still under embargo until the 29th because reasons. I can tell you that it’s a diverse and exciting bunch of books in terms of genre and technique, that I haven’t read any of them so far, and that I’m anticipating some great discussions with the other members of the shadow panel.

(They are: Annabel Gaskell of Annabookbel.net, Rebecca Foster of Bookish Beck, Dane Cobain of Social Bookshelves, and Clare Rowlandson of A Little Blog of Books.)

For more information, plus complete biographies of the shadow panel’s glamorous selves, check out the official website: http://youngwriteraward.com/#

And keep your eyes peeled for the shortlist announcement and reviews! This is the prize that recognised Andrew McMillan, Max Porter, Benjamin Wood and Jessie Greengrass, amongst others. (So, you know, all the cool kids are paying attention.)